Sunday, May 31, 2015

The San Francisco Bay Trail and the opening of the Ferry Point Loop Trail in Richmond: 31 May 2015

Two new components of the San Francisco Bay Trail were officially opened in Richmond. The additions were made to the Point Richmond area of the Bay Trail. The new changes to the trail network enabled the East Bay Regional Park District to open a new trail loop: The Ferry Point Loop Trail. I decided to go to Point Richmond on Sunday to participate in the "Grand Opening Schedule of Festivities." The event took place across the street from the Richmond Plunge. After the grand opening celebration, I decided to ramble about and see what was done to the Bay Trail. The improvements are helpful; they promote safety and will be appreciated by both pedestrians and bicyclists. One of the improvements was widening the walkway/bike path that goes through the Richmond Ferry Tunnel. The other improvement for bicyclists and pedestrians provides a second access route to historic Kaiser Shipyard 3


The grand opening ceremony. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
Bruce Beyaert is the chairman of the Trails for Richmond Action CommitteeClick on the image to see the full-size photo.
A view of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, as seen from Miller/Knox Regional Shoreline park. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
Angel Island is on the left; the northern tower of the Golden Gate Bridge is visible. The view is from Miller/Knox Regional ShorelineClick on the image to see the full-size photo.
The remains of the Richmond Ferry TerminalClick on the image to see the full-size photograph.
These building remnants are located adjacent to the remains of the Richmond Ferry Terminal. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
San Francisco is in the background and the western span of the Bay Bridge is on the left. It is foggy and windy. The breakwater was constructed when the Richmond Kaiser Shipyards were in operation. A view from Miller/Knox Regional Shoreline. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
This is the SS Red Oak Victory, a World War II Victory Ship built at the Richmond Kaiser ShipyardsClick on the image to see the full-size photo.
Another view from within Kaiser Shipyard #3. The Red Oak Victory's bow can be seen on the left. A Whirley Crane is the center of attraction in this snap. This example was manufactured during WWII and was used at the Kaiser Shipyards during the war. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The building is the former site of Ford Motor Company's Richmond assembly plant. It has had a very interesting historyIn the background is a view of San Pablo RidgeClick on the image to see the full-size photo.
The map shows the route of the majority of the ramble. The approximate distance traveled as tracked by GPS was 6.2 miles. The approximate cumulative elevation gain was 131 feet. Mile markers are shown on the route’s track. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.”-Dorothea Lange

You are welcome to visit my primary website  www.mishalov.com

Sunday, May 24, 2015

The Excelsior District of San Francisco: 24 May 2015

On Sunday San Francisco was under a thick fog cover with a light drizzle. I was in the Excelsior District of San Francisco, which is located in the southeast area of the city. I went to the Excelsior District to explore John McLaren Park. At 317 acres, it is the second largest park in San Francisco.

An overview of the location of the ramble. Click on the image to see the full-size map.
The blue building is Glen Park Elementary School. The school is just north of California Interstate 280 highway. This view is looking down Peru Avenue at Athens Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The small hill is Bay View Hill. It is 420 feet high. This view is from John McLaren Park; looking East. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
The highest manmade object in John McLaren Park is La Grande Tank.  Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

This snap was taken from McLaren Park. The houses are located in Daly City. The hilly area on the upper right of the snap is a small part of San Bruno Mountain.  The houses nestled on the hillside are located in the small town of Brisbane. This view is looking Southeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

University Mound Reservoir. This clean water reservoir is one of eleven in-use water storage facilities located throughout San Francisco. See the below map. The view is looking Northeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.


A picture of the University Mound Reservoir facility during construction. Looking North. Circa 1930s.

The locations of both in-use and unused reservoirs located in San Francisco.

The Cow Palace is located in Daly City. This snap was taken from John McLaren Park. This view is looking South. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
A photo of Balboa High School. The view is from the intersection of Onondaga Avenue and Otsego Avenue. The view is looking South. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The Jewish Home of San Francisco was founded in 1871. It is a staffed housing facility for elderly residents. This photo was taken from Mission Street and Silver Avenue. This view is looking Southeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This interesting building is Cleveland Elementary School. This photo was taken from Persia Avenue. This view is looking Northeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
The San Francisco Muni Metro Curtis E. Green Light Rail Center depot. The view is from Ocean Avenue; the cross street is San Jose Avenue, and the view is looking South. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The route of the 24 May ramble. The approximate distance traveled as tracked by GPS was 8.5 miles. The approximate cumulative elevation gain was 1,075 feet. Mile markers are shown on the route’s track. Click on the image to see the full-size map.
The graph shows the elevation changes encountered during the ramble. Click on the image to see the full-size chart.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.”-Dorothea Lange

You are welcome to visit my primary website  www.mishalov.com

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

A Cool and Foggy Day in San Francisco: 20 May 2015

A light drizzle was falling when I arrived at the West Portal Muni Metro Station. It was cool, foggy and somewhat windy. A perfect spring day in San Francisco!



The approximate distance traveled as tracked by GPS was 4.8 miles. The approximate cumulative elevation gain was 456 feet. Mile markers are shown on the route’s track. Click the image to see the full-size map.
This graph shows the elevation changes encountered during the ramble. Click the image to see the full-size chart.
This view is looking east. Oakland is on the opposite side of the bay. The picture was taken from Douglass Street, looking down Duncan Street. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
A rock garden on Diamond Street.Click the image to see the full-size photo.
 An apartment building at the intersection of Diamond Street and 25th Street. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
24th Street is the location of the Noe Valley shopping district. This is an apartment building on 24th Street,  Starbucks Coffee is a commercial tenant. Click the image to see the full-size photo.

A gaggle of children and their guardians are rambling down Sanchez Street. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
An apartment building at the intersection of Elizabeth Street and Sanchez Street. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
Watch out for the alligator at 765 Sanchez Street, she looks hungry. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
 John McLaren Park located in the Excelsior District is in south-eastern San Francisco. This view is from an area of Sanchez Street located in the Delores Heights Neighborhood. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
Entrance to the 16th Street Mission BART station, located in the Mission District. Click the image to see the full-size photo.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera." Dorothea Lange

You are welcome to visit my primary website at  www.mishalov.com

Sunday, May 17, 2015

San Francisco's Bay to Breakers foot race: 17 May 2015

I have participated in the San Francisco Bay to Breakers foot race more times than I can remember. The last time I did the race was in 2004. Here are three different photo galleries from 20022003 and 2004 races.

Today I boarded the 6:17 am BART train at the North Berkeley Station and arrived at the San Francisco Embarcadero Station at approximately 6:41. The first thing I did when I disembarked was to go to the Peet's Coffee shop in the Ferry Building for a cup of java. I then walked over to the start of the race on Howard Street. The race started at 8:00 am, and the official estimate is that there were approximately 50,000 registered and unregistered people who entered the race. The weather was overcast and cool. This was the 104th year that the race has been held.

It was a great race with views of people in fascinating and unusual costumes. This being San Francisco, some of the runners ran naked... yes, the only thing they were wearing were running shoes. Many of the naked runners would have looked much better if they were wearing clothing.


The route of the 104th edition of the San Francisco Bay to Breakers foot race. The race started in downtown San Francisco, and it finished on the Great Highway, adjacent to the Pacific Ocean and Golden Gate Park. The approximate distance traveled as tracked by GPS was 7.7 miles. The approximate cumulative elevation gain was 366 feet. Mile markers are shown on the route’s track. Click the image to see the full-size map.
This graph shows the elevation changes encountered during the Bay to Breakers. Click the image to see the full-size chart.
On a BART train heading to San Francisco. The fellow with the shark and life preserver lost his left leg while he was in the Army and stationed in Afghanistan. The loss of his leg was due to the explosion of a hidden enemy explosive device. He is going to walk the course. His companion is ready to race and show her strength. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
This is as close as I am going to get to the starting line before the race begins. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
And we are off! The race has begun, and the runners are heading up Howard Street. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
A view looking back down Howard Street. This location is approximately 1.5 miles into the race. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
We are heading up Hayes Street. The building is the Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall. This location is approximately 2 miles into the race. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
Ahead is the Hayes Street hill which is the biggest climb of the race. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
We continue to climb the Hayes Street hill. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
We reached the top of Hayes Street, and there is now a short downhill before we turn left onto Divisadero Street. This location is approximately 3 miles into the race. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
On John F. Kennedy Drive in Golden Gate Park; we are heading to the Pacific Ocean. This location is approximately 4.5 miles into the race. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
I am now on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in Golden Gate Park. In the distance on the horizon is the Pacific Ocean, and just ahead is a large sand dune which indicates that the ocean... and the finish, are just ahead. This location is approximately 7.2 miles into the race. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
The finish line of the 104th running of the San Francisco Bay to Breakers foot race. Another great public event put on with the cooperation and support of the City of San Francisco. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.”-Dorothea Lange



You are welcome to visit my primary website at  www.mishalov.com