Monday, December 26, 2016

Transbay Tower, now under construction, will soon be the tallest building in San Francisco: 26 December 2016

The San Francisco Transbay Tower is currently under constructiongroundbreaking took place on 27 March 2013. Initial occupancy is expected sometime in 2018. It will then officially be known as the tallest building in San Francisco. The Transbay Tower, when completed, will have a roof elevation of 920 feet (326 meters) and an antenna elevation of 1,070 feet (326 meters). 


This picture looking southwest was taken from Yerba Buena Island. The western span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is straight ahead. The Transbay Tower is the tall building under construction. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This photo was taken from the pedestrian/bicycle pathway on the recently constructed replacement of the eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. The Transbay Tower and Yerba Buena Island are visible. The final connecting section of the pedestrian/bicycle pathway was open to Yerba Buena Island on Sunday, 23 October 2016. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

The western span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge is visible, as is the Transbay Tower. This picture was taken from the pedestrian/bicycle pathway on the eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

A view of the Transbay Tower dominating downtown San Francisco, as seen from Yerba Buena Island. The Transamerica Pyramid building was previously the tallest building in San Francisco. The Transamerica Pyramid is visible on the right side of this photo. The view is looking southwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

The Transbay Tower is located at 415 Mission Street between First Street and Fremont Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The Transbay Tower. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

The Transbay Tower. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

The Transbay Tower. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The Transbay Tower. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

This is a view of Treasure Island as seen from Yerba Buena Island. Treasure Island has an interesting history. The Island is man-made and was constructed between 1936-37. The island was built as the site of the 1939-1940 Golden Gate International Exposition. The federal government created the island; in 1941 the island became a US Navy base known as Naval Station Treasure Island. The island remained under the control of the Navy until 1997. In 2010 the Navy sold the island to San Francisco. This view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” -Dorothea Lange


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with a Panasonic 14-42mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or a comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

Saturday, December 17, 2016

San Francisco's Inner Sunset District; a ramble on the residential hills of Golden Gate Heights: 17 December 2016

This was a beautiful day for a ramble through Golden Gate Heights, a neighborhood located in the Inner Sunset District of San Francisco.


Here is a five image panoramic photo of the Sunset District. Abraham Lincoln High School and Sunset Reservoir are both identifiable in the photo. On the horizon, 25 miles in the distance, and at the center of the image, is a barely visible view of the Farallon IslandsThe view is looking west. The picture was taken from within Sunset Heights Park, and just below the summit of Larsen Peak, 761 feet (232 meters)Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

Thanks to Brian Stokle for publishing this excellent topographic map of the hilliest area in San Francisco. The peaks comprising Golden Gate Heights are a part of this ramble. San Francisco is said to have 47 hills located within its boundary. Go here for more information about San Francisco's 47 hills. Click on the image to see the full-size map.

A tip of the hat to Brian Stokle for publishing this informative photograph which show some of the hills that were traversed during this ramble. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

The distance traveled was approximately 9.0 miles (14.5 kilometers). Mile markers are displayed on the GPS generated track. The cumulative elevation gain was about 1,575 feet (480 meters). Click on the image to see the full-size map.

This is Rustic Bridge; it is located in Golden Gate Park. The bridge was erected in 1893; it spans Stow Lake and connects Strawberry Hill with the rest of Golden Gate Park. Stow Lake is a man-made lake that was constructed in 1893Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

Here is a view from near the summit of Strawberry Hill, 404 feet (123 meters); the hill is surrounded by Stow Lake. A portion of the Outer Sunset District is visible in the distance. This view is looking southwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

Collis P. Huntington, a railroad baron, was persuaded In 1893 to pay for the construction of Huntington Falls, a man-made 110 foot cascading waterfall on the east side of  Strawberry Hill. The waterfall emptied into Stow Lake and cost Mr. Huntington $25,000. The above rock has the following statement chiseled on its face: "Huntington Falls, a gift of Collis P. Huntington, 1893."

This photo was taken from the intersection of Kirkham Street and 15th Avenue. This is the bottom of the 15th Avenue Steps. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

A view from the top of the 15th Avenue Steps. Ahead are Golden Gate Park, the Outer Richmond District, and Lands End. In the far distance, across San Francisco Bay, are the Marin Headlands and Mount Tamalpais. Strawberry Hill which is located in Golden Gate Park, is visible on the right side of the photograph. The view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

After ascending 15th Avenue Steps, it is a short walk to the top of the Hidden Garden Steps, and we then descended the stairway. The steps are located between Lawton Street and 16th Avenue. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

The Hidden Garden Steps. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

The Hidden Garden Steps. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The Hidden Garden Steps. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

These are some of the people who made the Hidden Garden Steps a reality. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

After the descent of the Hidden Garden Steps, it is a short distance to the intersection of Moraga Street and 16th Avenue, the location of the lower portion of the Golden Gate Heights Mosaic Stairway. This delightful work of art has received worldwide publicity since the mosaic tile work was completed in 2005. There are many people walking on the stairway and taking photographs, and for a good reason: this mosaic tile stairway is a beautiful sight to see. This view is looking east. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.


After ascending Golden Gate Heights Mosaic Stairway, we continued uphill to Grand View Park which is located at the summit of Grand View Hill, 666 feet (203 meters). The next four photographs were taken from the summit of Grand View Hill. 
 Sited on a high plateau at Lands End is the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The medical center hospital building was completed in 1934, and the VA Medical Center is located on the site of the Fort Miley Military Reservation. The view is looking northwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

 Golden Gate Park, the Richmond District, the Presidio, the Golden Gate Bridge, the Marin Headlands and Mount Tamalpais are all visible in this photo. This view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

 Mount Sutro, Sutro Tower, and Twin Peaks are visible in this photo. The view is looking east. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

 Downtown San Francisco is visible in the distance. In the far distance across San Francisco Bay are the Berkeley HillsThe view is looking east. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

This is West Portal Elementary School. The school accepted its first students in 1926. The site of the school is located about 100 feet above the West Portal entryway to Twin Peaks Tunnel. The tunnel became operational on 3 February 1918. Ninety-nine years later it is still providing excellent streetcar access between Market Street and the residential areas southwest of Twin Peaks. Click on the image to see the full-size picture.

A graph of the elevation changes encountered during the walk. Click on the image to see the full-size chart.

Thanks again to Brian Stokle. He published this excellent topographic map of San Francisco. Click on the image to see the full-size map.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” -Dorothea Lange


The initial publication of San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view the 2002 to 2011 photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with an Olympus 17mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Do you have a question or a comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com