Tuesday, July 11, 2017

San Francisco, from Cole Valley to Glen Canyon Park: 11 July 2017


Noe Valley as seen from Twenty-seventh Street at Castro Street. The view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The distance traveled was approximately 6.9 miles (11 kilometers). The cumulative elevation gain was about 995 feet (303 meters). Mile markers are displayed on the GPS generated track. Click on the image to see the full-size map.

The rocky and partially tree-covered Duncan & Castro Open Space is located in Upper Noe Valley. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

A view from the summit of Corona Heights Hill. The vista is looking northeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The 500 Club is a quintessential San Francisco dive bar. It is located in the Mission District on the southwest corner of the intersection of Guerrero Street and Seventeenth Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

NOW  Mission San Francisco de Asis was founded in 1776. This structure is the oldest intact building in San Francisco. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

THEN  This picture of Mission San Francisco de Asis is circa 1890. A portion of its cemetery is visible; it is the only cemetery still sited in the City and County of San Francisco. The view is looking west. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

Glen Canyon Park. The view is looking northwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

NOW  The New Mission Theater. The theater was built in 1916 and was updated in 1932. The theater closed in 1993 and was converted to a furniture store. After many bizarre twists and turns, the theater was renovated, and it reopened in 2015. The view is looking northwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

THEN  This photo was taken in 1943. The theater was designed by the Reid Brothers. The Nasser Brothers who owned the theater commissioned architect Timothy Pflueger to update the theater in the early 1930s. (Image courtesy of Jack Tillmany.) Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

THEN The New Mission Theater in 1935. The theater is on the west side of Mission Street, between Twenty-first Street and Twenty-second Street. Visible on the east side of Mission Street is the New Rialto Theater. It opened in 1916, and through 1987, a time span of over ninety years, the building was occupied by numerous theaters. The building then remained vacant for twenty-two years until 2009 when it reopened as a Billiard Palace and amusement arcade. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This graph shows the elevation changes encountered in this rambleClick on the image to see the full-size graph.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lang 

The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

Sony RX-100 camera was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com