15 May 2016

A bicycle ride on the Richmond portion of the San Francisco Bay Trail: 15 May 2016

I rode my bicycle from Berkeley to Point Richmond on the beautiful San Francisco Bay Trail. Photographs are displayed in the sequential order of the trip.
The distance traveled was approximately 26.1 miles (42 kilometers). The cumulative elevation gain was about 566 feet (172 meters).

The United States Department of Agriculture's Western Regional Research CenterClick on the image to see the full-size photo.
The mouth of Marin Creek during low tide. Marin Creek is a tributary of Codornices Creek. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The remnant of a ship dock built in Richmond sometime in the 1850s. The dock was constructed in a marshy area along the bay shore. It was erected during the Gold Rush to provide a jetty for small boats to travel to San Francisco. The boats helped to provide the rapidly growing San Francisco population with fresh produce. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
A yacht harbor located on the former site of Kaiser Permanente Richmond Shipyard No. 2. This view is looking west. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
Outside of the Craneway Pavilion area of the Ford Motor Company's Richmond Assembly Plant. The massive cargo vessel visible in the distance is the Felicity Ace, a vehicle carrier ship built in Japan and launched in 2005. The view is looking west. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
The main entryway to Sims Metal Management's scrap metal recycling yard located in Richmond. This view is looking east. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The recycling yard is busy on a Sunday. Trucks are taking scrap metal from the yard to a ship docked fairly close to this location. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
A truck loaded with scrap metal is slowly leaving the yard and is traveling a short distance to load the scrap metal on the ship. The destination of the scrap metal is Asia. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The site of Kaiser Permanente Shipyard No. 3. This shipyard produced a total of 35 Type C4-class cargo ships. Of the four Kaiser Permanente Shipyards in Richmond, Shipyard No. 3 was the only shipyard which had dry docks. Shipyard No. 3 was also designed to be a permanent shipyard. It remained active until 1970 when it closed down. Shipyards 1, 2 and 4 were designed for use only during the war and had long since been removed from the landscape. The Kaiser Permanente Richmond Shipyards combined production was 747 ships, the greatest number of ships constructed by a shipyard in the US during WWII. This view is looking south. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
A view of Shipyard No. 3's five dry-dock shipways. The SS Red Oak Victory is partially visible; she was constructed at Kaiser Richmond Shipyard No. 1 and was launched on 9 November 1944. The Whirly Crane in view was used at the Kaiser Permanente Richmond Shipyards during WWII. This view is looking east. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The Red Oak Victory and the Whirly Crane. This view is looking south. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
A WWII era Whirly Crane and the stern of the SS Red Oak Victory, as seen in Kaiser Richmond Shipyard No. 3. Whirly Cranes could hold up to 50 tons from their 100-foot booms. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The Felicity Ace is a Japanese 'car-carrier' cargo ship. On this trip, she traveled from Japan to Richmond California to unload Subaru vehicles. Subaru has a large secure outdoor car storage area on the site of Shipyard No. 3, where its cars are parked before being sent to their destination areas via railroad freight cars designed specifically to transport cars, vans, and small trucks. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
This immense concrete structure was the 'General Warehouse' of Kaiser Richmond Shipyard No. 3. It was the storage location of small and necessary items needed by the Merchant Marines assigned to each ship. For example: dishes, mirrors, cabinets, toilets, stoves, etc. A commonly asked question is why was this building constructed of concrete rather than wood and steel? During WWII, the primary use of metal was for the war effort. Using metal in the construction of a building was not acceptable during the war. Civilian cars were not constructed during the war. Jeeps, tanks, ships, and bombs were fabricated. This view is looking southeast.
"This structure was constructed in an unprecedented 120 days beginning in February of 1942. At four-stories and measuring 140 feet by 260 feet, it is the tallest building in the yard; its concrete construction and lack of windows also make it the most massive. Interior surfaces are concrete, including the floors, walls end ceilings. The main level of the structure is open, with a grid of square concrete columns".
From the History of Kaiser Shipyard No. 3Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
Two old brick kilns are still standing at Brickyard Cove. The Richmond Pressed Brick Company had a large brick factory located in this area. This view is looking south. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
Brickyard Cove is now an upscale waterfront neighborhood. The buildings in this picture are condominiums and the condo owners started this community garden last season. This view is looking northwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
Ferry Point Pier was constructed In 1899; it was the final destination on the Transcontinental Railroad. This structure enabled railroad freight cars to be removed from trains, put on barges, and then taken across San Francisco Bay to San Francisco for unloading. 
During WWII, the Ferry Point Pier was also the site to which Kaiser Richmond Shipyard workers who lived in San Francisco traveled to via ferries from San Francisco. From here it was a short bus ride to the shipyards. During WWII, more than 95,000 people at any one time, worked at all four of the Kaiser Richmond Shipyards. The construction of ships at the Kaiser Shipyards took place 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year until the conclusion of the war. This view is looking south. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
This photo, taken from the Miller/Knox Regional Shoreline, provides a view of southern Marin County. To the left of Mount Tamalpais is a view of the northeastern portion of the Tiburon Peninsula. On the right side of the photo is the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge. The bridge is 5.5 miles in length. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
A view of the southern entry to the Dornan Drive Tunnel, located in Richmond. The tunnel became operational in 1912; it is commonly referred to as the Richmond TunnelClick on the image to see the full-size photograph.
I came upon these Canadian Geese and their goslings adjacent to the Bayside Court Trail. They were very calm as I approached on foot; I made sure to move slowly and not get too close to the birds. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.”-Dorothea Lange

You are welcome to visit my primary website  www.mishalov.com

10 May 2016

San Francisco – a ramble through the Mission, Noe Valley, the Castro, Fisherman's Wharf, the Marina and Little Italy: 10 May 2016

                          Click on an image to view the full-size photograph
A beautifully renovated 19th Century House. The building is now being used as a four-unit apartment building. 


The map shows the path of the ramble. The route consists of five different activities:  
1. A walking segment in the Mission District, Noe Valley, and the Castro District. 
2. Then, a streetcar segment when we took an F-Market Streetcar from its terminus in the Castro District to its terminus at Fisherman's Wharf. 
3. Next up, another walking section as we walked from Fisherman's Wharf to the Marina District
4. Then a quick bus ride on a 30-Stockton MUNI bus from the Marina District to the Little Italy/Chinatown area. 
5. Finally, we walked to the Montgomery Street BART Station in the Financial District for the walk's conclusion. 

The total approximate miles traveled was 15.4 miles. Approximately 7.5 miles of the 15.4 miles were traversed either on the streetcar or the bus. Thus, we walked about 7.9 miles (12.7 kilometers). The cumulative elevation gain was approximately 1,100 feet (335 meters). 
After we had exited BART at the Mission-16th Street stop, we headed directly to the intersection of 18th Street and Guerrero Street, the location of Tartine Bakery. We consumed delicious pastry, drank some hot coffee, and were then ready to tackle our upcoming adventure.
Here is a downtown San Francisco skyline scene as seen from Mission Dolores Park. The park encompasses nearly 16 acres, and it is a favorite destination among San Francisco's many parks. 
During 1906 and 1907, the park served as temporary housing quarters for more than 1600 families made homeless by the 1906 earthquake. The camp ceased operation in 1908. 
In the late 1800s, part of the park was a Jewish cemetery. Available land in San Francisco is finite. Public housing and the necessarily associated structures became scarce as the population increased. The City of San Francisco eventually banned all new burials within the city limits. Some years later, the city required all cemeteries to cease operation. Human remains of more than 100,000 people were removed and transported to Colma, California where they were reburied. 
Other than Mission Dolores Park, the vast majority of the former SF cemeteries, located mainly in the Richmond District, are now sited with houses, apartments, stores, and schools.
Mark Zuckerberg, the CEO of Facebook, and his wife, Dr. Priscilla Chan, a pediatrician and philanthropist, purchased a house in the Upper Mission District in 2012 for 10 million dollars. The building, hidden from the sidewalk, is challenging to view from the street. Here is a picture of the house taken from the sidewalk. From what I understand, the couple is still living in Palo Alto. 
We are cranking up 21st Street and heading for Sanchez Street. When we reach Sanchez Street, we will drop down to 24th Street, which is the main shopping area of the Noe Valley District. Then we turn up on Castro Street and ramble through the Castro District. This view is from Sanchez Street, looking north down Church Street. 
The Davies Campus of the California Pacific Medical Center, as seen from Corona Heights Park
Here is another view from Corona Heights Park. In 1899 George and Harry Gray established a rock quarry and brick factory in what is now known as Corona Heights Park. The brothers were not known to be ethical businesspeople, and in 1914 George Gray was murdered by a former employee who was owed $17.50 in back wages. The massive earthen scars from the rock quarry/brick factory are visible. 
A view of the iconic Castro TheaterPatty Duke is the current featured Hollywood movie star as she appears in "The Miracle Worker" and "Valley of the Dolls." She died a few weeks ago at the age of 69, and the theater is featuring her movies as a tribute to her talents. 
 Roger is standing in front of Market Street Railway streetcar #1052. It was constructed in 1948 by the St. Louis Car Company. The streetcar will soon begin its trip to Fisherman's Wharf. We will board this streetcar and travel approximately 5 miles to the terminus of the F-Market route. We will then continue with our walk and go to the Marina District. 
Our streetcar driver is having a short conversation with the driver of Streetcar #1080, which is right behind us. 
We are on the streetcar rolling down Market Street as we pass the San Francisco Mint. 
We are still rolling down Market Street. Here is a picture of the intersection of Market Street & 5th Street. 
A view of the beautiful, eye-catching Sentinel Building, located on Kearney Street at Columbus Avenue near Jackson Square. Construction of the building started in 1906, before the earthquake. The building had its first occupants in 1907. The Sentinel Building is San Francisco Landmark #33. The current owner of the building is Francis Ford Coppola, the father of Sofia Coppola, the well-regarded movie director. 
This photo shows the iconic Transamerica Pyramid Building. Construction commenced in 1969, and the building was ready for occupancy in 1972. 

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"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams

"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt

The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photos.

 These photographs were taken with a Sony camera.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com.

30 April 2016

San Francisco – from the Outer Sunset District to the Financial District: 30 April 2016

I decided to walk through San Francisco on Saturday. I started the ramble in the Sunset District and headed north along Ocean Beach. Then it was up to Sutro Heights to visit the site of Adolph Sutro's Mansion. After which, I headed east on Geary Boulevard and California Street to Montgomery Street, where I concluded the ramble. The weather was perfect.

Click on an image to view the full-size photograph
Street art in the Outer Sunset District as seen on the side of a house on Irving Street.
A map of the route. The approximate distance traveled was 9.6 miles (15.4 kilometers). The approximate cumulative elevation gain was 777 feet (237 meters). Mile markers are displayed on the GPS-generated track. 
This graph shows the elevation changes encountered during the hike. Click on the image to see the full-size chart.
An apartment building on Irving Street. 
A view of the Cliff House and Seal Rocks. This picture was taken from the Ocean Beach pedestrian walkway. The glorious Marin Headlands are in the background. The view is looking north. 
A picture of the third of five Cliff Houses built on the same site. This photo was taken in 1896, the year the third Cliff House has been constructed. Interestingly, the photograph was taken by a camera held in the air by a giant kite. After the kite was at an appropriate height and the camera was facing the preferred direction, the camera's shutter was activated by a person on the ground. He or she pulled a wire which was connected to the kite and attached to the camera. 
You had only one opportunity to take a picture. After the photo had been taken, the kite was reeled in; the camera was removed from the kite. The camera was then taken to a 'dark room' where the exposed image became visible after the film was submerged in three different liquid chemical baths. 
Taking airborne pictures of terrain and manmade objects in the late 1800s and early 1900s was very popular. 
The third and most beautiful of the five Cliff Houses was destroyed by fire on 7 September 1907. 
The Cliff House and Seal Rocks as seen from Sutro Heights Park. The park is on the National Register of Historic Places. Here are some old photos that were taken at Sutro Heights Park
A game of volleyball on Ocean Beach. 
Looking south, towards Ocean Beach. Montara Mountain is visible. The photo was taken from Sutro Heights Park. You will not see anyone swimming in the ocean and very few people wading in the water. There is a good reason for that. Ocean Beach and most beaches in Northern California can be deadly to humans if people venture into the water or are too close to the water and a rogue wave pulls them in. The ocean's violent and powerful rip currents have pulled many thousands of people out to the ocean from Ocean Beach. The frigid temperature of the water can disable a person within a few minutes. Most of the people pulled out into the ocean have drowned, unfortunately. 
Another photo of the Cliff House and Seal Rocks. The Marin Headlands are in the distance; the view is looking north. 
statue of Diana the Huntress. She is located on the site of the old Sutro Mansion. She and her animal friend are looking a little tired, but please remember that they have been at this location since 1886. 
A picture of the Diana the Huntress statue was taken in 1886 at the same location. One of the many gardeners who maintained the gardens looks at the camera. 
A photograph of Diana the Huntress is seen from the rear. 
This San Francisco firehouse was built in 1928 and is located on 41st Avenue at Geary Boulevard in the Outer Richmond District. It is Firehouse #34, whose primary function is to serve as one of two San Francisco Coastal Rescue Units. The firehouse is not far from Lands End, and there are many locations in Lands End from which a careless or foolish person can lose their footing and fall off a cliff. 
A picture of the Russian Orthodox Cathedral on Geary Boulevard in the Richmond District. 
A four image panoramic photo looking east towards downtown San Francisco. The photograph was taken from Masonic Avenue. 
On Geary Boulevard in the Richmond District
                                                                ...........
"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams

"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt

The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photos.

 These photographs were taken with a Sony camera.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com.