Tuesday, August 2, 2016

The Haight Ashbury, the Grateful Dead, the Conservatory of Flowers, and the de Young Museum: 2 August 2016

 A mellow walk in the western portion of San Francisco.
On Haight Street. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
  The approximate distance traveled as tracked by GPS was 4.7 miles (7.6 kilometers).  Mile markers are shown on the route’s track. Click the image to see the full-size map.
 On Cole Street, in Cole Valley. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
 In Cole Valley. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
 On Belvedere Street in the Cole Valley neighborhood. The northern portion of Tank Hill is visible in the background. The name was chosen because a water storage tank was constructed on top of the hill by the Spring Valley Water Company in 1894. The tank, at an elevation of 650 feet (198 meters), was a repository for drinking water which was pumped up from the Laguna Honda Reservoir. The water tank was removed in 1957. The concrete foundation of the tank is the only reminder of the long forgotten storage facility. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
 
 This is 710 Ashbury Street. Between 1966 and 1968 the Grateful Dead lived in this house. The house was constructed in 1890. Click the image to see the full-size photo.

    THEN. Grateful Dead band members are hanging out at the house. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
  NOW. Fifty years later, what once was is no more. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
    This eye-catching work of art can be seen on the building at the southwest corner of Haight Street and Ashbury Street. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
 On Haight Street. Ok, will do. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
      This photograph was taken from Golden Gate Park. The University of California San Francisco Medical Center is visible in the background. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
 The Conservatory of Flowers is located in Golden Gate Park. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
Click the image to see the full-size photo.
Inside the Conservatory of Flowers. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
         This photo was taken near the front of the Conservatory of Flowers. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
      A photograph of the Music Concourse with the Spreckels Temple of Music, also known as the "Bandshell" at the front of the concourse. I took this photograph from the base of a monument erected in 1887 in memory of Francis Scott Key, who wrote the Star Spangled Banner. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
  
   A view of the Francis Scott Key Monument. The estate of James Lick (1796-1876) financed the construction of the monument. Visible behind the Francis Scott Key Monument is the de Young Museum. The view is looking North. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
The Francis Scott Key Monument as seen in 1890. This view is looking South.
 Inside the de Young Museum. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
        This photo was taken from the top floor of the de Young Museum's tower. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
 This is a photo of the California Academy of Science, as seen from the top floor of the de Young Museum's tower. The Francis Scott Key Monument is visible on the left side of this photo. This view is looking South. Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
 
A picture of the Richmond Branch of the San Francisco Public Library. This branch, which is located on 9th Avenue between Geary Boulevard and Clement Street, opened in 1914. It was built with funds donated by the Andrew Carnegie Foundation. Thank you, Andrew CarnegieClick the image to see the full-size photo.

A photo of Clement Street, in the Inner Richmond.  Click the image to see the full-size photograph.
     This picture was taken from Clement Street at Park Presidio Boulevard. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
   This photo shows the removal of sand during an early stage of construction on a lot on 18th Avenue at Geary Boulevard.The vast majority of land in western San Francisco consists of sand dunes. There are very few visible indications that the roads and buildings are constructed on sand dunes. This photo attests to the reality of sand dunes beneath the western portion of San Francisco. Click the image to see the full-size photo.
I concluded this little adventure by taking a Muni Metro 38R-Geary Rapid bus from Geary Boulevard in the Richmond District to downtown San Francisco. Click the image to see the full-size photo.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.”-Dorothea Lange

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