Saturday, February 18, 2017

Grateful Dead & Jefferson Airplane, Golden Gate Park: Then & Now, 28 Sept 1975 and 18 February 2017

I reviewed an article recently published by SFGate. The write-up displayed 65 archival photographs of Golden Gate Park. One photo, in particular, caught my eye. It was photograph #32, a picture of the Grateful Dead at an outdoor concert in 1975. The information about the image stated that the show took place at Lindley Meadow. I decided to go to Lindley Meadow in Golden Gate Park and find the location of the musical performance, based on the topographical data shown in the photo. It took me a little while to conclusively determine where the concert took place on that cold, blustery Sunday many years ago. Most members of both bands are still alive; however, some musicians have died, and the bands are no longer active.

This was a free concert by the Grateful Dead and the Jefferson Airplane. An estimated 40-50,000 people gathered at Lindley Meadow in Golden Gate Park on 28 September 1975. This was also the Grateful Dead’s first public performance in nearly a year.

The weather was chilly and overcast, but the weather did not dampen enthusiasm as the 
Jefferson Airplane mounted the stage to a standing hometown ovation, and for the next two hours played their old favorites. "Don't anyone go away!" Paul Kantner shouted over the applause, "The Grateful Dead are coming on!"

Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh was the first to plug in and face the audience. The crowd roared its approval. Elsewhere onstage, pianist Keith Godchaux breathed into his cupped hands to keep them warm, while his vocalist wife Donna smiled with the anticipation of singing some of the newer Dead songs. Behind them, drummers Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann were warming up. Then a leather-jacketed Jerry Garcia stepped forward and sent out a trademark guitar riff, marking the start of a great two-hour concert.



 The Grateful Dead on stage at Lindley Meadows, Golden Gate Park, 28 September 1975. The view is looking west. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.





Grace Slick and the Jefferson Airplane at Golden Gate Park, 28 September 1975. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

 A view of Golden Gate Park. The view is looking southeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

Latitude and longitude coordinates (37.7692, -122.4862) indicating the approximate location of the stage on 28 September 1975 are shown on this map. Click on the image to see the full-size map.

 The Grateful Dead on stage THEN 1975. The view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

NOW  The approximate location of the stage. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.



Paul Kantner of the Jefferson Airplane on stage THEN 1975. The view is looking east. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.


 NOW  The approximate location of the stage. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

The Grateful Dead on stage THEN 1975. The view is looking east. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

NOW  The approximate location of the stage. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.



“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” -Dorothea Lange


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with a Panasonic 14-42mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

Sunday, February 12, 2017

San Francisco Then & Now – The Old Mint: 12 February 2017

The San Francisco Mint was opened in 1854 to manufacture gold coins from gold bullion produced during the California Gold Rush. The mint soon needed a bigger building to process and store the large quantities of gold bullion it was receiving. In 1869 the mint moved to a larger building located at 88 5th Street at Mission Street. That building is now known as the Old Mint, and it is one of the few buildings that survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire. The damage caused to San Francisco by the 18 April 1906 earthquake pales in comparison to the devastation caused by the fifty-two fires that burned through the city for more than three days. There were 315 people killed outright, and 28,000 buildings were destroyed, most by fire. 

The Old Mint was designed by Alfred B. MullettHe planned a building which was built around an enclosed central courtyard that contained a water well, a feature that helped save the building during the fires of April 1906. The building was constructed on a concrete base, the objective of which was to thwart tunneling into the mint's vaults. At the time of the 1906 fire the mint held $300 million dollars in gold, a third of the United States’ gold reserves. Heroic efforts by the employees of the mint saved the building and the gold bullion stored in its vaults. The mint resumed operation soon thereafter. The Old Mint continued to function until 1937 when the currently operating mint was opened on Hermann Street in San Francisco. 



    The Old Mint THEN: 1885. Note the horse-drawn streetcar. The view is looking southwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

    The Old Mint NOW: 12 February 2017Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

 The Old Mint THEN: 18 April 1906. The view is looking southeast

 The Old Mint NOW: 12 February 2017Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The Old Mint sits forlorn amidst total devastation, after it survived both the earthquake and fire. This picture was taken soon after the 18 April 1906 earthquake and fire. The camera was attached to a kite; the view is looking northwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” -Dorothea Lange


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with a Panasonic 14-42mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

Saturday, February 11, 2017

San Francisco Then & Now – The N-Judah light-rail line: 11 February 2017

The N-Judah Muni Metro light-rail line runs along Judah Street in the Sunset District for much of its length; it is named after railroad engineer Theodore Judah. The N-Judah line connects downtown San Francisco to the Cole Valley and Sunset neighborhoods. The line ends at the Pacific Ocean. It is the busiest light-rail line in the Muni Metro system; it served an average of 41,439-weekday passengers in 2013. The N-Judah line is also the only Muni Metro light-rail line that passes through the Sunset Tunnel. The N-Judah line began operation as a streetcar line in 1928 and was converted to a light-rail transportation system with the opening of the Muni Metro system in 1980.


The below photos were taken in the Inner Sunset neighborhood

The N-Judah Line THEN: 1978. This streetcar is heading west on Irving Street. It is about to turn south onto 9th Avenue. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The N-Judah Line NOW: 11 February 2017. This two car N-Judah light-rail vehicle is about to leave Irving Street and travel south on 9th Avenue for just one block. After which, the N-Judah light-rail turns west, onto Judah Street, and travels to the end of the line at Ocean Beach, and the Pacific Ocean.  Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The N-Judah Line THEN: 1978. This streetcar is heading south on 9th Avenue. Golden Gate Park is visible in the background. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The N-Judah Line NOW: 11 February 2017. This two car light-rail vehicle is heading south on 9th Avenue. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The N-Judah Line THEN: 1975. This streetcar headed south on 9th Avenue for one block before it is about to turn west onto Judah Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The N-Judah Line NOW: 11 February 2017. This two car light-rail vehicle is heading south on 9th Avenue just before it is about to turn west onto Judah Street and continue to Ocean Beach, the end of the line. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The distance traveled was approximately 5.8 miles (9.3 kilometers). Mile markers are displayed on the GPS generated track. The cumulative elevation gain was about 374 feet (114 meters), the cumulative elevation descent was 581 feet (177 meters). Click on the image to see the full-size map.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” -Dorothea Lange


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with a Panasonic 14-42mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Rainy day photos of Berkeley, California: 8 & 9 February 2017


Rain, beautiful rain... A house on Josephine Street, North Berkeley. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
 Monterey Market is located on Hopkins Street, North Berkeley. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
The North Berkeley Branch of the Berkeley Public Library is located on The Alameda. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
 Cedar Grocery Market is located on Cedar Street at California Street, North Berkeley. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
 The Berkeley Cheese Board Pizza Collective is located on Shattuck Avenue, North Berkeley. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
 The bread and pastry area of the Berkeley Cheeseboard Collective in North Berkeley. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
 The Hopkins Street shopping area, North Berkeley. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
 The original Peet’s Coffee Shop is located at the corner of Vine Street and Walnut Street, North Berkeley. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
 Berkeley Natural Grocery is located on Gilman Street in the Westbrae area of Berkeley. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” -Dorothea Lange


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

An Olympus TG-4 camera was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

Saturday, January 28, 2017

San Francisco's Mission District: 28 January 2017

The 18 April 1906 San Francisco earthquake occurred at 5:12 a.m. Because of the violent and prolonged shaking, which lasted approximately 42 seconds, the earthquake produced significant damage to a large number of buildings. It was also the cause of approximately 52 out-of-control fires that burned unabated for approximately three days. The many fires slowly worked their individual ways through a large area of San Francisco, causing death and destruction.


THEN  This picture was taken from Mission Delores Park on 19 April 1906, the day after the earthquake. The view is looking northeast. On the left is Mission High School, which first opened its doors to students in 1896. The school survived the earthquake and fire of 1906, but sadly, it was destroyed by fire in 1922. The high school was rebuilt, and the new campus reopened in 1927. 
All of the houses visible in this picture were, by the end of the day, consumed by flames. The boy at the bottom left of the photo appears distraught. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

NOW  This is a current view of the 19 April 1906 photograph. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

This apartment building is located at the southwest corner of 18th Street and Valencia Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
Here is another apartment building. It is located at the northeast corner of 16th Street and Julian Avenue. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
This is a J Church Muni Metro streetcar heading towards Noe Valley. It is traveling on tracks which are contiguous with the western side of Mission Delores Park. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

Mission National Bank is located at 3060 16th Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
A banda excelente is playing some rocking Mexican music, directly above the underground BART 24th Street Mission train station. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
Click on the image to see the full-size photo.
Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.
The Guerrero Hill Market is located on northeast corner of Guerrero Street and 22nd Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” -Dorothea Lange


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with a Panasonic 14-42mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or a comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

Saturday, January 7, 2017

San Francisco's Sutro Heights - Then & Now: 7 January 2017

Starting in the 1880s, large tracts of land located on San Francisco’s Outside Lands were purchased by Adolph Sutro. Mr. Sutro was a German immigrant who had earlier built Sutro Tunnel. The tunnel was a drainage tunnel designed to drain the excessive hot water from the deep underground silver mines of the Comstock Lode which was located in Virginia City, Nevada

Adolph Sutro became a permanent resident of San Francisco after the Comstock Lode Tunnel in Virginia City had been completedHe constructed many landmarks in San Francisco that are popular to this day. Among these were the Sutro Baths, the Mount Sutro Forrest, the Sutro Heights Parapet, Mount Olympus, as well as other resources which were made available to the people of San Francisco. Thank you, Adolph Sutro!

Adolph Sutro also built the second version of the Cliff House, a beautiful seven-story Victorian structure that became, and has remained, the most famous and beloved incarnation of the Cliff House. Both the second version of the Cliff House and the Sutro Baths were opened in 1896. The Cliff House survived the 1906 Earthquake but burned to the ground in 1907, just fifteen months after the 18 April 1906 earthquake. The Sutro Baths were destroyed in 1966. Adolph Sutro was the 24th mayor of San Francisco, serving from 1894 to 1896

Adolph Sutro arrived in the United States on 21 November 1851. He married Leah Harris in 1856; they had six children, four girls, and two boys. Adolph Sutro died in 1898. The executor of his estate was one of his daughters. She was a medical doctor: Dr. Emma Sutro Merritt. It took Dr. Emma Sutro Merritt more than ten years to settle her father's estate. She did an excellent job; her father's name is still remembered and widely respected, one hundred and nineteen years after his death.

I began this ramble by first taking a few pictures at and around the Ferry Building in downtown San Francisco. All of the below photographs were taken in the midst of a multi-day storm which provided the parched Northern California terrain with much-needed rain and snow. I used a waterproof camera to take the photos.


This is a view of Ocean Beach as seen from Sutro Heights. The view is looking south. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.


The San Francisco Ferry Building was designed in 1892 and was completed in 1898. It is located on the Embarcadero at Market StreetClick on the image to see the full-size photo.


Streetcar #1893 was built in Italy in 1928 for the Milan, Italy municipal streetcar line. It is now in service on the San Francisco F streetcar lineClick on the image to see the full-size photo.


Streetcar #1057 was built in 1948 and is painted to honor Cincinnati, Ohio, which ran streetcars from 1939 to 1951. It is now in service on the San Francisco F streetcar lineClick on the image to see the full-size photo.


I took a San Francisco public transit bus to Geary Boulevard at Arguello Street and then began my ramble to Sutro Heights and the Pacific Ocean. This picture was taken on Clement Street. This mother and daughter are thsame people in a photo I took on Clement Street during November 2016. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.


These pictures of Adolph Sutro were taken by Mathew Brady sometime between 1865 and 1880.


THEN This picture of the Sutro Baths was taken in 1897. The buildings were constructed in 1894. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

  NOW A fire destroyed the Sutro Baths in 1966The rock outcropping straight ahead is known as North Seal Rock. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.


This map of Sutro Heights and Sutro Baths is circa 1896. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.


THEN This is a picture of the second Cliff House constructed at this location. The picture was taken in 1896; Adolph Sutro spent $75,000 to build this beautiful building; the Cliff House is resplendent in all its glory. The photo was taken from the observation tower located on Sutro Heights Plaza.  Seal Rocks are visible as is a steam ship about to enter San Francisco Bay. This version of the Cliff House was destroyed by fire on 7 September 1907. A picture of the above-mentioned observation tower may be seen in this gallery of pictures, four photos below. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.


THEN This picture was taken in 1868. It is a photo of the first Cliff House. The photographer was Carlton Watkins (1829-1916). Mr. Watkins was a famous American photographer of the 19th Century. His area of expertise was landscape photography. The first Cliff House was destroyed by fire in1894



THEN This picture is circa 1930 and it shows the third and current version of the Cliff House. Dr. Emma Sutro Merritt, the executor of the Sutro Estate did not want to build another wooden Cliff House because of the proven fire danger. In 1909 she authorized the construction of the third Cliff House. The building she had built was constructed of steel and concrete. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

      NOW  I took this picture of the third iteration of the Cliff House. The building has had numerous modifications over the past one hundred and five years, but it is still the same basic building. This photo was taken from the Plaza on Sutro Heights ParapetClick on the image to see the full-size photo.


THEN This is the entry gate to Sutro Heights as seen in 1886. The Sutro family donated the 18 acres property to the City of San Francisco in 1938. In 1939 the Works Progress Administration (WPA) demolished the residence. Most of the statues were removed with the exception of The Lions at the entry gate. Sutro Heights Park is no longer a city park, it is now a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation AreaClick on the image to see the full-size photo.



NOW The Lions are still guarding the entry way to Sutro Heights. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.



THEN. The Sutro Heights Parapet and plaza as seen circa 1894. Note the observation tower as mentioned four pictures above, in this edition of the photo blog. Please note the stairway seen in both this photo and the below photographClick on the image to see the full-size photo.


NOW. This photo of the Sutro Heights Parapet was taken from the North Esplanade. Note the same stairway as seen in both of the above photographs.  Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.



THEN. This picture of the Sutro Heights Conservatory was taken in 1896. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.



NOW.  This is the site of the Sutro Heights ConservatoryClick on the image to see the full-size photograph.



Ah yes, this is where the mouth of San Francisco Bay meets the Pacific Ocean. The view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.



Moving through Lands End, and rambling northeast on the Coastal TrailClick on the image to see the full-size photograph.



This photograph was taken from the Lands End Trail. Ahead is a small cove which is known as China Beach. Surrounding China Beach is a portion of the Seacliff neighborhood of San Francisco. The beach seen on the left is part of Baker Beach. Baker Beach is located within the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. It was previously a part of the Presidio, an Army military base. China Beach is a part of the City and County of San Francisco. This view is looking southeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.



A view  of the Golden Gate Bridge as seen from the Lands End TrailAngel Island is visible behind the bridge. This view is looking east. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.



A view of the Lincoln Park Steps. The steps were constructed in the early 1900's. During May of 2015, a celebration was held for the recent addition of the beautiful and delightful mosaic tile workClick on the image to see the full-size photo.



Going to downtown San Francisco on a Muni Metro 38R bus. The bus is now on Geary Boulevard, traveling east through the Richmond DistrictClick on the image to see the full-size photograph.


The distance traveled was approximately 6.3 miles (10.1 kilometers). Mile markers are displayed on the GPS generated track. The cumulative elevation gain was about 471 feet (144 meters). Click on the image to see the full-size map.


“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” -Dorothea Lange


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

An Olympus TG-4 camera was used to take these photographs.

Question or a comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com