10 August 2017

Japan, Part Two – Photographs taken in 1968 & 1969

I was on active duty in the U.S. Army from 6 September 1967 to 12 April 1969. While on active duty I served the majority of my time as a soldier in the 7th Ordnance Company (Special Ammo). The 7th Ordnance Company was a component of the 83rd Ordnance Battalion, which was a part of the U.S. 8th Army. The 83rd Ordnance Battalion was sited adjacent to Seoksu-dong, a small village located about twenty miles south of Seoul, Korea. During my Korean tour of duty, I had the opportunity to visit Japan twice; during November 1968 and also during March 1969.

Below are some of the photos that I took while in Japan. The National Archives of Korea expertly scanned and digitized each photograph. I do not include a description of each image; I prefer to let the pictures speak for themselves. 

Click on each image to see the full-size photograph.



























Go Here to view Japan, Part One


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Photographs that I took while in Korea. 

Go Here to view Part One

Go Here to view Part Two

Go Here to view Part Three

Go Here to view Part Four

Go Here to view Part Five

Go Here to view Part Six

Go Here to view Part Seven

Go Here to view Part Eight

Go Here to view Part Nine

Go Here to view Part Ten

Go Here to view Part Twelve

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"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lang 


"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams
"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt

Would you like to see additional photographs that I took while in Japan? If so, I suggest that you go to my Korean-Japanese photo page. Scroll to the bottom of the page to access my Japanese photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

“A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lang 

Nikon F camera mounted with either a Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 lens or a Nikkor 200mm f/3.5 lens was used to take these photographs.