09 April 2017

San Francisco – from West Portal to Edgehill Mountain; and then to the Mission District via Noe Valley: 9 April 2017

Of the many hills in San Francisco, seven are said to have been named at the time of the city’s founding: Nob Hill, Russian Hill, Telegraph Hill, Rincon Hill, Twin Peaks, Lone Mountain and Mount Davidson

In addition to the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay, the hills are San Francisco's most prominent geographical feature. The same colossal forces that caused the 1906 and 1989 earthquakes have shaped the hills; the hills range in elevation from 100 feet to 925 feet. While most of San Francisco is built on sand, many of its hills stand on Franciscan or serpentine bedrock. 

Edgehill Mountain was once part of Adolph Sutro’s San Miguel Ranch. This property was sold by Sutro’s estate after his death in 1898. Edgehill Mountain then became one of the city’s first subdivisions. 

The summit of Edgehill Mountain, 734 feet (224 meters), was leveled, and houses were constructed on and adjacent to the summit. Houses were also built on the mountain's western and southern slopes. Serious problems with building on this land began in 1953 when winter rains caused a home to slide down the western mountain side. Edgehill Mountain Park was established in 1985 when the city purchased 1 acre of the mountain’s undeveloped, western slope and designated the area an Open Space Park.

The unsettled question is how many hills are actually located in San Francisco? The answer to that question varies from seven to fifty-three, depending on what you read or to whom you speak.


Edgehill Mountain, 734 feet (224 meters), is ahead. The picture was taken from Dorchester Way; the view is looking northeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This is a view of Mount Davidson, 925 feet (282 meters); it is the tallest hill in San Francisco. This picture was taken from the southern side of Edgehill Mountain; the view is looking southeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This photo was taken from Edgehill Way on the northeast side of Edgehill Mountain. Twin Peaks are ahead, as is Sutro Tower; the view is looking northeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This is a view from Garcia Avenue. The large rectangular buildings ahead are part of  Laguna Honda Hospital, a sprawling complex constructed in the early 1920s. The hospital’s history dates back to the founding of the city. The view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This photo was taken from Idora Avenue. Mount Sutro is visible; the view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This photo was taken from Woodside Avenue. In the distance, across San Francisco Bay in Marin County, is Mount Tamalpais, 2,572 feet (784 meters); the summit is sheathed in clouds. The view is looking north. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

Downtown San Francisco is visible in the distance. Trans-Bay Tower is still under construction and it already is the tallest building in San Francisco. This picture was taken from Portola Drive; the view is looking northeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.



The mural 'I Still Have A Dream' is located on Twenty-fourth Street in Noe Valley. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The distance traveled was approximately 4.8 miles (9.1 kilometers). The cumulative elevation gain was approximately 470 feet (143 meters). Mile markers are displayed on the GPS generated track. Click on the image to see the full-size map.

This chart shows the elevation changes encountered during this ramble. Click on the image to see the full-size graph.

"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lang 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams
"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view these photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with an Olympus 17mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

08 April 2017

The San Francisco Legion of Honor: 6 December 2016

Click on an image to see the full-size photograph. 



  

   


   

  Four image panorama. 







  Anna Hyatt Huntington (1876-1973), an artist who made the sculpture of Joan of Arc.

The distance traveled was approximately 5.7 miles (9.1 kilometers). Mile markers are displayed on the GPS-generated track. 

"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams
"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with an Olympus 17mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

28 March 2017

A ramble from the Warm Springs BART station to the summit of Mission Peak, and back: 28 March 2017


It has been about 17 years since BART decision-makers publically mentioned the possibility of adding 5.4 miles of train track between the Fremont BART station, the southerly most station in the East Bay, and Warm Springs, which is located in the southern portion of Fremont. I read recently that BART was finally opening the new Warm Springs BART station on Saturday, 25 March 2017. 

I looked at a map to see the exact location of the newly opened Warm Springs BART station, and after a short review of the map, I decided to do a ramble from the Warm Springs BART station to the summit of Mission Peak, 2,520 feet (768 meters), and then back to the Warm Springs BART station. The distance traveled would be approximately 10.5 miles (16.9 kilometers). About six miles of trails and 4.5 miles on public streets. The cumulative elevation gain would be about 2,542 feet (774 meters). 

Donna joined me on this somewhat strenuous hike. We left the Berkeley BART station at 7:45 am and arrived at the Warm Springs BART station at around 8:50 am, at which time we immediately started our ramble to Mission Peak. It took us about 5 hours and 30 minutes to do the hike.

Click on an image to see the full-size photograph.
The Warm Springs BART station. The view is looking west. 

The Inside the Warm Springs BART station. The view is looking southwest. 

A view of Mission Peak as seen from the Warm Springs BART station. This picture is looking east. 

Here is another view of Mission Peak as seen from the Warm Springs BART station. 

A view from the Ohlone Wilderness Trail. The Tesla car factory is located in the light-colored factory buildings seen ahead to the left of the center. That area is also the location of the new Warm Springs BART station. The view is looking west. 

On the Ohlone Wilderness Trail. Fremont is ahead. The view is looking northwest. 

Looking east from the Ohlone Wilderness Trail. The summit of Mission Peak beckons. 

Cows grazing near Peak Meadow Trail. The view is looking southeast. 

A view of Mount Diablo, 3,849 feet (1,173 meters), as seen from near the summit of Mission Peak. This scene is looking northeast.

Donna is enjoying our adventure. We are now on the Peak Trail and are very close to the summit of Mission Peak. The view is looking northwest. 

The summit of Mission Peak. The view is looking west.

We are descending Horse Heaven Trail. Here is a view of the summit of Mission Peak. This scene is looking northeast. 

The beautiful hills of California. 
The Ohlone Wilderness Trail is visible; we will be leaving the park shortly, and then we will walk back to the Warm Springs BART station for the train ride home. It is approximately thirty-five miles from Warm Springs to Berkeley via BART. 

This map shows the locations of the Warm Springs BART station and Mission Peak Regional Preserve. The area shown is in the southeast portion of the Bay Area. 

The distance traveled was approximately 10.5 miles (16.9 kilometers). Six miles were on trails, and 4.5 miles were on public streets. Mile markers are displayed on the GPS-generated track. The cumulative elevation gain was about 2,542 feet (774 meters). 

This graph shows the elevation changes encountered during the hike. 
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"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera." Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams
"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view these photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with a Panasonic 14mm-42mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com

22 March 2017

Bernal Heights Hill and the Mission District of San Francisco: 22 March 2017

Bernal Heights Hill and the Mission District are contiguous and are located in the eastern area of San Francisco; near San Francisco Bay. This little ramble started on 16th Street in the Mission District and traveled south on Alabama Street, past Precita Park, to Bernal Heights Hill. After a short cruise around the hill, I descended to the Bernal Heights neighborhood. The ramble ended in the Mission District at 24th Street.



A view from the north side of Bernal Heights Hill. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This photo was taken from Sanchez Street. Bernal Heights Hill is straight ahead. The Mission District is to the left of the hill. The view is looking southeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

This is the original Mission Police Station; it was built in 1902 and is located at 3057 17th Street. The building ceased being used as a police station in 1950, at which time the San Francisco police department relocated the Mission Police Station to a larger facility at 1240 Valencia Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The northwest corner of 24th Street and Alabama Street in the Mission District. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

Bernal Heights Hill is straight ahead; the view is looking southwest. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This photo, taken from Bernal Heights Hill, is looking northeast. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

This view from Bernal Heights Hill is looking east. Oakland is visible across San Francisco Bay. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

This view from Bernal Heights Hill is looking west. Diamond Heights and Mount Davidson are visible, as is Billy Goat Hill which is straight ahead at the terminus of 30th Street. Click on the image to see the full-size photo.

Precita Park. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

An aerial view of Bernal Heights Hill looking east. I do not know the name of the person who took this picture, unfortunately. Please email me if you know his or her name. Click on the image to see the full-size photograph.

The distance traveled was approximately 5 miles (8 kilometers). Mile markers are displayed on the GPS generated track. The cumulative elevation gain was about 746 feet (227 meters). Click on the image to see the full-size map.

This graph shows the elevation changes encountered during the hike. Click the image to see the full-size chart.

"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams

"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt


The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view these photo galleries.

Panasonic GX7 camera body mounted with a Panasonic 14-42mm lens was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com