01 July 2016

Ascending the west side of Mount Sutro: 1 July 2016

Donna and I ascended San Francisco's Mount Sutro from the west side of the 909 foot (277 meters) mountain.
The western portion of the mountain was enveloped in morning fog; a cold wind was blowing, and the rain was falling. The west part of San Francisco is the foggiest area of San Francisco, especially in the summer. Fog from the Pacific Ocean barrels into the Sunset District and then hits the western flank of Mount Sutro. On this hike, the eastern side of the mountain was not only less foggy, but there was also no wind nor rain.
After we had descended the mountain's eastern flank, we went to La Boulangerie de San Francisco on Cole Street for some java and pastries. We then walked through the Cole Valley and Corona Heights neighborhoods and took a Muni Metro F-Market & Wharves streetcar from Castro Street/Market Street to Fisherman's Wharf. After which, we took a little stroll in Fisherman's Wharf and proceeded to walk on Columbus Avenue through North BeachWe finished the hike in the Financial District.

Click on an image to view the full-size photograph.
The Forest Hill neighborhood

The map shows an overview of the location of the combined hiking route & streetcar route. The distance traveled by foot was approximately 7.5 miles (12.1 kilometers). The distance traveled by streetcar was about 5.5 miles. The total distance traveled was approximately 13 miles. The cumulative elevation gain was 1,155 feet (352 meters). The map shows a GPS-generated route track which includes walking and streetcar data plus mile markers. 


This graph shows the elevation changes encountered during the hike. 

Climbing the west side of Mount Sutro. The view looks north, and Grand View Park is barely visible in the fog. St. Anne of the Sunset Catholic Church can be seen on the far right. The large church has a red facade. 
Cranking up Oakhurst Lane during the ascent of Mount Sutro. The view is looking east

The summit of Mount Sutro is at an elevation of 909 feet. From the late 1950s through the 1960s, this was Nike Missile Radar Acquisition site SF-89C. This radar site was the eyes for Nike Missile Launching site SF-89L, located at the Presidio Army Base. The missile launching and radar acquisition sites were approximately 2.5 miles apart. They had a line-of-sight view of one another. Donna took this picture as I was looking at location information on a Garmin GPS device. A GPS has proven to be indispensable when I am traversing terrain. It is the difference between knowing where you are and where you are going and getting lost.

Descending the Greenbelt Trail on the eastern flank of Mount Sutro
Looking at Bernal Heights Summit, as seen from the Corona Heights neighborhood. The view is looking southeast. 
The intersection of Market Street and Castro StreetWe will board an F-Market Streetcar at this location and take the streetcar to Fisherman's Wharf. The view is looking south. 
This map shows the route we took on the ascent and descent of Mount Sutro.


"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera." Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams

"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt

The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photos.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com.

15 June 2016

San Francisco, from West Portal thru the Sunset, past the Cliff House, thru Lands End and into the Richmond: 15 June 2016

We took the San Francisco L-Taraval Muni Metro streetcar line through Twin Peaks Tunnel to the West Portal StationWe then did a short walking tour of St. Francis Wood before returning to the West Portal Station. After which, we boarded another L-Taraval streetcar heading towards the Pacific Ocean. We exited the streetcar at 24th Avenue and proceeded to walk north, through the Sunset District, towards Golden Gate Park. We passed Sunset Reservoir, which has a storage capacity of approximately 180 million gallons of water. The City of San Francisco had 25,000 solar panels attached to the roof of the reservoir in 2010. The solar panels add 5 million watts of electricity to the San Francisco power grid annually.

When we reached Judah Street, we boarded an N-Judah Muni Metro streetcar and took it to the Great Highway at the continent's North American edge. We walked north, past the Cliff House and the Sutro Baths site, and entered Lands End, a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. We walked through Lands End and then viewed the Lincoln Park Steps. The steps were recently upgraded with a magnificent colored tile facade. We then walked through the Richmond District. At Geary Boulevard at Stanyan Street, we boarded a 38-Geary bus, going to downtown San Francisco, which was the walk's conclusion.

Click on an image to view the full-size photograph
The Lincoln Park Steps. The view is looking west. 
This map shows an overview of the location of the hike & streetcar/bus transportation. Included on the map is a GPS-generated track of the route, including mile markers
The site of the Sutro Baths. The view is looking north. 
The Cliff House. The view is looking north. 
The site of the Sutro Baths. The view is looking north. 
The site of the Sutro Baths. The view is looking west. 
The site of the Sutro Baths. The view is looking south. 
The Golden Gate Bridge as seen from Lands End. The view is looking east. 
 The Marin Headlands and Mount Tamalpais as seen from Lands End. The view is looking north. 
The Golden Gate Bridge as seen from Lands End. The view is looking east. 
The distance traveled by foot was approximately 8.2 miles (13.2 kilometers). The distance traveled by public transportation was approximately 5.8 miles. The total distance traveled was 14 miles. Included on the map is a GPS-generated track of the route, which includes walking, streetcar, and bus data. 
"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams

"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt

You are welcome to visit: www.mishalov.com

12 June 2016

Point Reyes National Seashore: 12 June 2016

This was a fast-paced hike at Point Reyes National SeashoreThe walk started at the Bear Valley Visitor Center. We first cranked up the Mount Wittenberg Trail, and then descended the Sky Trail to the site of the recently collapsed Arch Rock. After a fifteen-minute lunch break, we returned to the hike's start via the Bear Valley Trail. Seventeen people participated in this beautiful and somewhat challenging hike.
On 21 March 2015, Arch Rock collapsed killing one person and critically injuring another person.

Click on an image to view the full-size photograph. 
A view from the site of Arch Rock, looking north.

This map shows an overview of the location of the hike. Included on the map is a GPS-generated track of the route, including mile markers
The hiking group on Mount Wittenberg. 
The group has been moving fast, and we are now taking a 2-3 minute rest break on the Sky Trail. 
This lovely tree is located adjacent to the Sky Trail. 
A view of Coast Creek shortly before it meets the Pacific Ocean. 
A view looking north, the Coast Trail is visible. 
About 15 months ago, Arch Rock collapsed, killing a San Francisco preschool teacher. 
 This photo was taken from a helicopter by a National Park Service photographer shortly after Arch Rock's collapse on 21 March 2015. 
A view of the remains of Arch Rock.

This graph shows the elevation changes encountered during the hike. 
The distance traveled was approximately 11.4 miles (18.3 kilometers). The cumulative elevation gain was about 1,801 feet (549 meters). Included on the map is a GPS-generated track of the route, which includes mile markers. 

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"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams

"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt

The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photos.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com.    

31 May 2016

San Francisco, a ramble through Glen Park, Diamond Heights and Noe Valley: 31 May 2016.

Click on an image to view the full-size photograph.

This is a map of the route. Mile markers are shown on the GPS generated track. 

A graph of the elevation changes encountered during the walk. 
The bottom of the Harry Street Steps.
Mount Davidson, the highest natural point in San Francisco (938 feet, 286 meters) as seen from Walter Haas Park
Sutro Tower and Twin Peaks, as seen from Walter Haas Park.
J-Church Muni Metro Streetcar. 
The southern terminus of Noe Street. 
A view of downtown San Francisco as seen from Billy Goat Hill Park. 
A view of San Bruno Mountain, as seen from Walter Haas Park. 
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"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams

"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt

The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photos.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com  

20 May 2016

Vargas Plateau, East Bay Regional Park, Alameda County: 20 May 2016

Vargas Plateau Regional Park, located high in the hills between Fremont and Sunol, was a former cattle ranch. The park opened recently as the newest addition to the East Bay Regional Park District. It is a relatively small park, with approximately 6 miles of trails on 1,249 ridge-top acres.

The new park did not come easily into existence. The East Bay Regional Park District acquired most of the land in the mid-1990s for 6.6 million dollars from the two families ranching it, the Vargas and the Tavares families. But after the acquisition, a long-drawn-out legal battle with neighbors over the amount of vehicular traffic and public parking delayed the opening.
A settlement was eventually reached with nearby property owners, which involved limiting visitor parking to a small lot outside the park’s entrance. 
                          Click on an image to see the full-size photo


A view looking west, across San Francisco Bay. The Santa Cruz Mountains are in the background. The massive dirigible airship hangers are somewhat visible at Moffett Federal Airfield. The cities of Mountain View, Cupertino, Palo Alto, and Menlo Park, are across San Francisco Bay and they are within the area of this photograph. 

Sunol Peak, elevation 2,178 feet (664 meters). This view is looking east. 

This view is looking southwest. 

It was a cool, windy, and cloudy day. 

Mission Peak, elevation 2,497 feet (761 meters). 



This view is looking west, across San Francisco Bay. The  Dumbarton Bridge is visible, as are the cities across the bay of San Carlos, San Mateo, and Redwood City. The body of water at the foot of this hill is known as the Quarry Lakes Regional Recreation AreaIn addition, Alameda Creek flows through the recreational area. Coyote Hills Regional Park is identifiable in this photograph. 

The distance traveled was approximately 3.9 miles (6.3 kilometers). The cumulative elevation gain was about 583 feet (178 meters). The GPS generated track of the route includes mile markers. 

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"A camera is a tool for learning how to see without a camera.” Dorothea Lange 

"Photography has not changed since its origin except in its technical aspects, which for me are not important." Henri Carter-Bresson

"There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer." Ansel Adams

"The important thing is not the camera but the eye." Alfred Eisenstaedt

The first volume of the San Francisco Bay Area Photo Blog contains galleries of photographs that were posted on the Internet between 2002 and 2011. Click Here to view those photos.

   An Olympus camera was used to take these photographs.

Question or comment? I may be reached at neil@mishalov.com